Madness, Put to Good Use.

Hello, dear reader!

Thanks for stopping by! Here’s a little bit about me and why I write…

Over the course of 20+ years in academic philosophy, I’ve always kept in mind the words of the American philosopher John Dewey:

“Philosophy recovers itself when it ceases to be a device for…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 20

“The Death of Seneca” (1871) by Manuel Domínguez Sánchez (Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

Welcome to Part 20 in the series! Here we’ll be looking at the ideas of three Roman Stoics… so we’ll be picking up some themes first broached in Part 17.

Previous entries can be found by clicking here:

Before we get started, I have a confession to make… I’ve…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 19

Lucretius Carus, Titus; Adams, John, 1735–1826, former owner (No restrictions, via Wikimedia Commons)

“Just when the gods had ceased to be, and Christ had not yet come, there was a unique moment in history…when man stood alone.” — Gustave Flaubert

Hello and welcome to Part 19 in the Series!

In this installment, we’re focusing on another Roman figure who lived during the last…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 18

Cicero denounces Catiline (1912) by Hans Werner Schmidt (Public Domain)

Welcome back! This is Part 18 in the series.

Now that we’ve finished our whirlwind tour of the Greek Hellenistic schools, it’s time to fix our gaze upon Rome. You can review previous entries by clicking here:

In this installment we’ll be looking at the eclectic philosophy of Marcus…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 17

Alexander the Great and Diogenes (ca. 1820) by Felize Giani (Public Domain)

Hello again!

Welcome to Part 17 of the series!

In this entry we’re transitioning away from the Classical/Hellenic period and into what’s commonly known as the Hellenistic period. The event most often held as the threshold between the Hellenic and Hellnistic eras is the death of Alexander, in 323 BCE.

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 16

Statue of Aristotle in the Aristotle park of Stagira (Neptuul, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

Hello again!

This is the fourth installment on Aristotle… and the sixteenth of the series! Here we’ll be exploring Aristotle’s moral and political ideas. You can also check out what’s come before by clicking here:

As was often the case, Aristotle was the first ever to pen a systematic…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 15

“Aristoteles” (1811) by Francesco Hayez (Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

Welcome to Part 15 of the series!

Here we’ll be taking a look at Aristotle’s cosmology, which — because he was a good pagan —could just a readily be called his theology, too.

We’ll also consider how a common translation of one of Aristotle’s most famous statements relates to the…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 14

Engraving by Charles Laplante (19th c.) Public domain (via Wikimedia Commons)

Hello again!

Welcome to Part 14 of the series and our second installment on the philosophy of Aristotle. If you’d like to see how we arrived here, you can check out the whole series below:

Part 13 ended with an introduction to Aristotle’s hylomorphism — the combination of “form”…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 13

Reconstruction of the mosaic depiction of the Battle of Issus after a painting by Apelles found in the House of the Faun at Pompeii (Behnam N, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

Now that we’ve wrapped up our exploration of Socrates and Plato, it’s time for the series to turn toward Aristotle. But, in case you missed any of those earlier installments, you can always check them out here:

I’ve been teaching ancient Western philosophy (in my day job as a…

Series | History of Ancient Western Philosophy, Pt. 12

Parmenides, Zeno of Elea, and Socrates (Image by author)

Welcome back everyone.

In this twelfth part of the series, we’ll be looking at one of Plato’s most challenging — and controversial — dialogues, the Parmenides. This dialogue continues the story arc of Plato’s theory of the Forms. …

Christopher Kirby, PhD

Father, husband, son, brother, philosopher, life-long student. Professional site at: https://www.christopher-c-kirby.com/

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